Need and Want

    Posted on November 7th, 2012 in The Wealthy Spirit by chellie

    Updated insider information by Chellie Campbell, author of “The Wealthy Spirit: Daily Affirmations for Financial Stress Reduction”

     

    311-November 7

    “It’s possible to own too much. A man with one watch knows what time it is; a man with two watches is never quite sure.”—Lee Segall

     

    “Let’s go shopping—I need to buy some clothes!” I told my friend, Shelley.

    “Need?” she asked.

    She caught me. “Well, no,” I admitted. “I already have clothes, so this isn’t about need. It’s really about having some fun at the mall!”

    “That sounds good,” she replied. “Let’s go!”

    We often overuse the word “need.” It’s been mentioned by various prosperity teachers that using the words “need” and “want” create a feeling of lack and limitation rather than abundance and wealth. If you’re needy, you’re poor; if you want things, it’s because you don’t have them. The dictionary definition of want includes: “1. A lack; shortage; 2. Poverty; 3. Craving; 4. Something needed.” Need is partially defined as “1. Necessity; 2. Lack of something desired or required.” These words are better avoided if we desire (almost said want!) prosperity.

    Watch your usage of these words today. When you use them, how are you feeling? Are you feeling anxious from a sense of lack and limitation?

    Continued on page 311 of The Wealthy Spirit

    Today’s Affirmation: “I richly enjoy my rich life!”

    Sometimes people get a little too wrapped up in the words. I’ve read self-help authors who say they don’t believe in affirmations, but they believe in positive thinking. I think there was a backlash to using the word “affirmation” because too many people were thinking they were magic phrases that would somehow win them the lottery. Clearly, that isn’t a workable strategy in the material world. Then the word is a little too “new agey” for some people, and they don’t want to use it because they want to be taken seriously.

    In “9 Steps to Financial Freedom”, Suze Orman calls these positive thoughts “your new truth” and the press labeled them “money mantras.” T Harv Eker, in “Serets of the Millionaire Mind”, calls them “declarations.” My friend Rhonda Britten, author of “Fearless Living” calls them “intentions.” Affirmations, Zillionations, Schmillionations – I don’t care what you call them. Call them “assertions” if you’re practical. Call them “affirmations” if you’re metaphysical. Call them “Chellie Chants” if you’re fun. Call them anything you like. Just call them.

     

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