Sometimes It Helps to Know a Big Fish

    Posted on April 19th, 2012 in The Wealthy Spirit by chellie

    Updated insider information by Chellie Campbell, author of “The Wealthy Spirit: Daily Affirmations for Financial Stress Reduction”

    109-April 19

    “A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back again when it begins to rain.”—Robert Frost

     

    Sometimes, when you’re a little fish, you can get what you need by enlisting the support and help of a big fish.

    After I graduated from college and got a job, I qualified to get my first credit card, a Bankamericard. (Those were the dark ages, before credit card companies found out how lucrative it was to give credit cards to students.) I used the card intermittently, and always made my payments on time. I had an excellent credit record.

    When I got married three years later, I asked to have my husband’s name added to my card. They immediately asked for me to turn in my credit card, telling me that I had to reapply for credit with my husband. (I told you those were the dark ages.) I dutifully filled out another application, along with my husband.

    They denied our application.

    They denied it on the basis that he was a free-lance actor, therefore self-employed, therefore without verifiable income. We were angry, but didn’t know what we could do, until we saw a Bankamericard commercial on television, starring Dennis Weaver. Weaver, at the time, was the president of the Screen Actors Guild! Without further ado, we wrote a scathing letter to Mr. Weaver, telling him in no uncertain terms that we were very unhappy that the president of our union was supporting a company that denied credit to actors.

    Within two days, we received a two-page letter from Dennis Weaver’s attorneys. Attached was a copy of the letter they had sent to the Bank of America demanding that this matter be rectified. The day after that, I received a call from the president of the Bank of America, asking me what he could do to make me happy. I said he could send me a Bankamericard. You can bet I had one the next day. I wrote thank you notes to him, to Dennis Weaver, and to his attorneys.

    You can have right on your side, but it helps to have might on your side, too. Is there a place in your life where you see injustice? Can you do something about it? Will you alone have enough resources to get the job done? Or do you need to enlist the support of someone else?

    Walk softly, but know a big fish.

    Today’s Affirmation: “I have powerful supporters who help me accomplish great things!”

    When I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, there weren’t any role models for what I wanted to do. In all of the families in my neighborhood, the moms were homemakers and the dads worked at an outside job. In those days, job ads were classified under “men wanted” and “women wanted” and the job descriptions were really different. Working women were secretaries, nurses, and teachers – not executives, doctors, or professional speakers. I believe I picked “acting” as a profession because it was as close as I could get to independent business owner. There was no woman I knew or even read about who owned a business.

    I was lucky in one important respect – I was the oldest child of 3 girls, and research has shown that often in these family circumstances, the father will give more success-oriented instruction to the eldest daughter when there are no male children. My dad always encouraged me to be a winner, to get good grades, to be president of a club, the lead in the school play. Still, when I brought the boys home and beat them at ping-pong, Dad took me aside and said, “Let the boy win.” Too late, dad! I loved winning and being in charge of things and I wasn’t going to stop.

    When I graduated from college in 1970, women’s lib was just getting started. “Equal pay for equal work” was the motto, and arguments were made for fair employment practices for all. The Civil Rights Act, Title VII and other legislation made it illegal to discriminate on the basis of gender. Overtly. But so much of it is subtle and pervasive that we don’t even see it, or when we do, we think it’s the natural order of things.

    Part of the problem is that women just aren’t taught or encouraged to negotiate their salaries, ask for bonuses and promotions, or research exactly what their worth is in the marketplace.

    What has been your experience?

    One Response to 'Sometimes It Helps to Know a Big Fish'

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    1. Jan said,

      on April 19th, 2012 at 8:15 am

      My first job overscale was a raise my ex negotiated for himself and they didn’t want him to get that much so they gave $5 of his raise to me. (1963) Unions give us a chance for equal pay, that’s a start. Other raises came when everyone else at the same status got the same, but I knew men managed more under the table. Lots of dough raised under those tables.
      Entrepreneurship is the place I can address my enthusiasm for more than just equal. Equal and more!

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