Do What Makes Money First

    Posted on April 30th, 2011 in The Wealthy Spirit by chellie

    Updated insider information by Chellie Campbell, author of “The Wealthy Spirit: Daily Affirmations for Financial Stress Reduction”

    120-April 30

    “If you want to leave footprints in the sands of time, wear work boots.”—Anonymous

    I have three rules for making money:

    1.     Do what makes money now.

    2.     Do what makes money soon.

    3.     Do what makes money later.

    This is of primary importance if you are in sales or own your own business (then you’re in sales too). The primary responsibility of a business is to be profitable and the primary responsibility of a salesperson is to bring in the money. Without sales, there is no money. If there is no money, there will be no business.

    You need immediate money to survive. It’s no good spending all your time working on the big project that won’t materialize for a year if you have don’t have the money to survive until that big deal comes through. It’s okay to be building the big battleship, but you’d better make sure you have lots of little canoes going out in the meantime. On a weekly basis, I suggest spending 60 percent of your time on your daily bread and butter sales, 20 percent on mid-range sales, and 20 percent on the big deal that may take a long time to close.

    Do what makes money first. Everything else is administrivia.

    Today’s Affirmation: “I am richly paid for the fun work I do!”

    Today’s guest blog post is from my friend and coach, Jamee Tenzer. She sent the following article in her newsletter this week. I thought it was great, and wanted to pass it along to you.

    Finding More Time, Just Like Magic

    Complete this sentence; I would love to do more “X,” but I just don’t have the time.  This is a favorite of the working mom.  We are (after all) busy and sometimes over-scheduled.  And, we perceive ourselves to have time for certain activities while having to put other pursuits on the back burner.  And, at the rate we’re going that back burner isn’t getting turned on until we’re pushing 80.

    Case in point; one of my clients decided a few years ago that she has no time to read.  This is a minor source of disappointment for her, so I asked her about the decision and learned that she has gathered very impressive evidence to back her argument including; with a job and two children she’s too tired to read, a book takes so long to get through at her very slow rate it’s not worth it and if she’s going to be reading, she feels she should be reading something that is useful for her profession.  This sounds pretty convincing, don’t you think?

    But, how much of this is perception?  Are all of her reasons still true?  Or were they true when she made the decision, but now out of date?  I asked her to imagine that she had never made that decision about reading.  I asked her to throw out her reasons and start fresh.  The first thing that happened was she realized she didn’t have a book that she was excited about reading.

    That was an eye opener.  Most of us have had that delicious feeling of being so involved in a book, we can’t WAIT to get back to it.  She needed to have a book like that sitting on her bedside table instead of the MBA’s Guide to Managing Upward.  So she went to her local library – someplace she had not been to in a decade – and found a book that she thought she would enjoy.  She reported that it had been so long since she had picked up a fun, sexy, (dare I say “trashy?”) novel she almost felt like she was sneaking it home.  And like a child who is looking at a plastic pumpkin full of candy on Halloween, she couldn’t wait to devour it.

    Here’s an added bonus; when she went to the library, she took her children and everyone got a book.  After they checked out their books, they checked into the local Starbucks for cookies, juice, coffee and some quiet reading time.  30 minutes later she was 20 pages into her book and hooked.  Within 2 weeks, they were back to the library for more.

    So what happened here?  Her life circumstances didn’t change at all, but she suddenly was inspired to make time for reading.  Instead of telling herself there was not time, she found a reason for making the time, and it showed up.  Kind of like magic, but you and I can create this kind of magic daily.

    Coach Me Quick Tips for finding more time:

    Identify something you “wish you had time for.”

    Write down all the reasons you “don’t have that time.”

    Now, allow yourself to adopt the attitude that you do have time.  Imagine that something has changed and you now get to take time for this activity.  Once you have accepted that reality temporarily, list all of the reasons you do have the time.

    Take a look at the list of reasons why you do have the time to do your chosen activity.  Could you create any of these?  Do you see a new possibility?

    Stay open.  Life changes every minute and if you don’t get stuck in old decisions, reasons and beliefs, you will find more time to do what you love in life

    Staying open to the possibilities,

    Jamee

    Jamee Tenzer, PCC is a professional certified life and executive coach for working women and mothers. After 3 to 6 months of coaching, new careers are born, closets are cleaned, weekends open up and personal time reappears. To schedule a complimentary session contact: Jamee@jameetenzer.com or follow Jamee on Twitter: jameetenzer

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